Update from The Weingart Foundation

Feedback from Our Grant Partners: 2021 Survey Findings

Listening and responsiveness to the field are core values for our foundation and an integral part of our approach to advancing racial justice. To help inform our work, we regularly engage the Center for Effective Philanthropy (C.E.P.) to conduct a survey of grant partners, inviting candid and actionable feedback from nonprofits we support.

Key Takeaways from the Feedback Survey:

  • Partners value our commitment to racial equity. Over 80% of the partners surveyed made a change related to racial equity as a result of working with us.
  • Partners share thar our unrestricted, flexible and multi-year funding is critical for building organizational capacity, improving outcomes and impact, providing financial stability, and enhancing their ability to respond to emerging needs and opportunities. They encourage us to continue to provide unrestricted operating support, multi-year grants, and to make larger investments.
  • Partners appreciate our more streamlined processes, spending a median of 20 hours across all requirements over the grant period, a shorter amount than is typical with most funders.
  • Partners also shared that we have an opportunity to bring more clarity to our grantmaking process and further deepen our connection to community partners.

To delve deeper into the insights we gained through the survey and to share more about our grantmaking process, we created this video featuring Joyce Ybarra, our Director of Grant Operations, in conversation with Patricia Watkins, who is part of our team of program officers. Please visit our website to learn more about the survey findings and to access a full copy of the report.

New: Read Program Officer Anthony Ng’s Perspective Piece “Rolling Back Progress: Why SCOTUS Decisions Matter”

The Weingart Foundation supports nonprofit organizations in the pursuit of social change. Like many of our partners, we are concerned about the direction SCOTUS. is taking and the deep implications these rulings have that disproportionally affect BIPOC, L.G.B.T.Q.+, immigrant, and marginalized communities. Read more about why SCOTUS decisions matter.

Rolling Back Progress: Why SCOTUS Decisions Matter

By Anthony Ng, Program Officer

Anthony Ng

Anthony Ng, Program Officer

The Weingart Foundation’s commitment to racial justice and to supporting communities directly impacted by systemic racism is what spoke to me when I joined the staff earlier this year. I am inspired and grateful to our nonprofit partners that are in the trenches every day fighting for a better tomorrow where we can all thrive.

While our nonprofit partners bring me hope, I know that many of us who are committed to social justice have felt grief and despair as we witness what feels like the roll back of civil rights across the country, particularly from recent rulings by the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS). As these feelings creep up, I remind myself of this phrase popularized by organizer Mariame Kaba, “Hope is a discipline.”

This past session SCOTUS ruled on important cases that have implications on social and racial justice issues. In the Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization ruling, SCOTUS reversed a five-decade-long judicial precedent set by Roe V. Wade that affirmed the right to privacy, and thus the right to abortion. The right to privacy allowed the expansion of rights in the areas of marriage, family, reproduction, and contraception. Justice Thomas’s concurrence in Dobbs V. Jackson signals the possibility of limiting the rights of LGBTQ+ communities as well as reducing access to contraception.

Another landmark case with civil rights implications is Vega V. Tekoh where SCOTUS ruled that an officer’s failure to read Miranda warnings to people in custody does not provide a basis for a claim for civil liability. This ruling reduces police accountability in a time when we’ve seen rampant police misconduct.

In the last decade, we’ve seen court decisions that erode the voting rights of marginalized communities of color (Shelby v. Holder) , that impact LGBTQ+ people (Bostock v. Clayton County, GA / Zarda v. Altitude Express / RG & GR Harris Funeral Homes Inc v. EEOC), and that harm immigrant communities (Garland v. Gonzales). If this pattern continues, other rights will be on the chopping block, effectively turning back the clock on the civil rights and progress that many marginalized communities have fought for.

Soon SCOTUS will take on cases around affirmative action, LGBTQ+ discrimination, voting rights, redistricting, immigration enforcement, and more. The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program is also at risk, leaving 800,000 people like me in limbo. These cases will impact the quality of life of many communities, what rights we are afforded, and who can represent us in our government.

The Weingart Foundation supports nonprofit organizations in the pursuit of social change. Like many of our partners, we are concerned about the direction SCOTUS is taking and the deep implications these rulings have that disproportionally affect BIPOC, LGBTQ+, immigrant, and marginalized communities.

While SCOTUS has the power to drastically impact our lives, the community also has the power to pushback. We can change outcomes through community organizing, civic engagement, and systems change. We must take this time as a call to action to keep investing in power-building strategies, support BIPOC-leadership, and uplift marginalized communities. We must continue to center those most affected by injustice and lift their perspectives and solutions. We must be co-conspirators in the pursuit of equity, social justice, and racial justice, and we must remember that “Hope is a Discipline”.

The Weingart Foundation Invests Over $8.7 Million in Nonprofits Advancing Racial Justice

The Foundation’s giving reflects its intentional effort to invest in BIPOC leadership, transforming systems that perpetuate racism, and providing critical services to those most in need.

June 28, 2022 (Los Angeles, CA) — The Weingart Foundation, a private grantmaking foundation, awards 64 grants totaling over $8.7 million to organizations advancing racial justice, providing critical services, and building political power in underserved communities. Half of the grantees are new partners for the Weingart Foundation as an intentional effort to deepen reach with emerging organizations and those led by Black, Indigenous, Persons of Color (BIPOC).

“Our commitment to racial justice calls on us to invest in the organizations deeply connected to the communities most impacted by racism and unequal systems,” said Miguel A. Santana, President and CEO, the Weingart Foundation. “More than three quarters of our new partner organizations have leadership whose lived experience reflects that of the people served. We’re proud to invest in BIPOC leaders as we work together to advance racial justice.”

Immigrant and refugee rights and integration is an area of special interest for the Weingart Foundation. Many partners that serve people who are immigrants exemplify cross-racial, cross-identity efforts that are critical in building solidarity and racial healing. For example, Black LGBTQIA+ Migrant Project, which builds and centers the power of Black LGBTQIA+ migrants to ensure the liberation of all Black people through community building, political education, organizing, and access to direct services, and the TransLatin@Coalition, founded by Latin@ transgender, gender nonconforming, and intersex immigrant women in Los Angeles to advocate for policy change and services for their community and develop and promote Trans leadership.

“We understand that when we center Black liberation it leads to the liberation of all people. As new partners, we’re looking forward to working with the Foundation to continue to cultivate the power and voice of Black LGBTIQA+ migrants and to connect them to critical services and support,” said Oluchi Omeoga, Co-Director of the Black LGBTQIA+ Migrant Project, a new Weingart Foundation partner.

In step with its commitment to transforming systems, the Weingart Foundation continues to prioritize investing in power-building ecosystems emerging in Orange, San Bernardino, and Ventura counties. Many first-time grantees are organizing communities of color around community-identified priorities such as: criminal justice (Peace and Justice Law Center and OC Justice Initiative), economic justice (Cooperación Santa Ana), environmental justice (OC Environmental Justice Fund and People’s Collective for Environmental Justice), and housing justice (House Farm Workers!).

Many Weingart partner organizations are on the front lines providing critical direct services to communities most impacted by systemic racism. Nearly two-thirds of the $6.9 million dollars the Foundation awarded in unrestricted funds supports organizations that provide key essential services such as health, mental health, housing, and reentry support.

Partners providing vital services include Center for Living and Learning, the only reentry organization in the San Fernando Valley offering workforce development, led by Executive Director Maria Alexander who is a former client of the Center; Riverside-San Bernardino County Indian Health, Inc., a culturally competent health care provider serving Native Americans throughout the Inland Empire; and Forgotten Children, a Black-led, women-led anti-human trafficking organization providing young women throughout south Los Angeles with a safe space and healing services to rehabilitate and rebuild their lives.

“On behalf of the Weingart Foundation Board, we’re proud to partner with organizations committed to structural change so that all communities can thrive. We look forward to working with both our long-term nonprofit partners and to forging new partnerships to advance our mission of racial justice,” said Aileen Adams, the Weingart Foundation Board Chair. “We are energized and inspired by the work our nonprofit partners lead each and every day.”

For a full list of grants, please visit the Weingart Foundation website.

ABOUT THE WEINGART FOUNDATION
The Weingart Foundation is a private, nonprofit grantmaking foundation that partners with communities across Southern California to advance racial, social, and economic justice for all. Our vision is a dynamic and effective social change sector that is creating equitable systems and structures needed to achieve justice. Founded in 1951, the Foundation has to date granted over $1 billion to organizations, strengthening their efforts in human services, health, education, and community power building. In addition, the Foundation builds networks and collaboratives with philanthropic, public sector, and community leaders to advance equity and justice together.

Meet Our New Program Officer, Anthony Ng and Join Us for the Immigration Summit (June 1 – 2)

Anthony Ng

Meet Anthony Ng, Our New Program Officer

Anthony Ng (he/they) is a long-time advocate for immigrant rights stemming from his lived experience as one of 800,000 people eligible for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. His background in community organizing and dedication to social justice brought him to the Weingart Foundation as a participant of the first cohort of the John W. Mack Movement Building Fellows, a Weingart program that strengthens racial justice leaders and the movement building infrastructure in our region.

We are excited to see Anthony continue this work in social justice as our new program officer for special projects and communication, where he focuses on our areas of special interest including immigrant/refugee integration and rights, housing justice, and strengthening nonprofit effectiveness.

Learn more about Anthony Ng, in this video interview with Program Director Vera de Vera.

Join us for the 2022 Immigration Summit (June 1-2) at Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels

The Weingart Foundation is proud to sponsor the 2022 Immigration Summit, an in-person summit featuring bold campaigns that are building immigrant power, visionaries looking at the future of immigrant justice and new data on the state of immigrants in LA. The conference is co-sponsored by the California Community Foundation, Immigrants Are LA, and USC Dornsife Equity Research Institute.

Register today!

The Weingart Foundation Board of Directors Welcomes New Board Members Katie Nguyen Kalvoda, Michael Tubbs, and Jacqueline Waggoner

The new Board members bring a deep commitment to racial justice and experience driving solutions that advance racial equity.

April 20, 2022 (Los Angeles, CA) — The Weingart Foundation, a private grantmaking foundation that partners with communities across Southern California to advance racial justice, welcomes Katie Nguyen Kalvoda, founder and C.E.O. of G3 Ventures; Michael Tubbs, founder of EPIC and Mayors for a Guaranteed Income and former Mayor of Stockton; and Jacqueline Waggoner, President, Solutions Division, Enterprise Community Partners, to the Board of Directors.

“The Board is delighted to welcome these new members, all of whom have demonstrated an unwavering commitment to racial justice,” said Aileen Adams, Chair of the Weingart Foundation Board. “These talented and committed leaders will add valuable expertise, powerful lived experiences, and a deep understanding of the communities we serve. We look forward to working with them.”

“As changemakers and visionary leaders, our new Board members will add tremendous insight to the Weingart Foundation Board,” said Miguel A. Santana, President and C.E.O. of the Weingart Foundation. “Individually, they each have a track record of advancing racial justice. Their innovative leadership on impact investing, alleviating poverty, and creating affordable housing solutions will advance the Foundation’s work.”

Katie Nguyen Kalvoda is the founder and C.E.O. of G3 Ventures, a social enterprise specializing in innovative philanthropy, impact investments, and community advocacy. She is a Board member of the Sisters of St. Joseph Healthcare Foundation and an appointed member of the California Health Facilities Financing Authority. Kalvoda, who lives in Orange County, is a long-time advocate for progressive values in the A.A.P.I. community and serves on the boards of A.A.P.I. Victory Fund and A.A.P.I. Victory Alliance.

Michael Tubbs is the founder of EPIC (End Poverty in California), the founder of Mayors for a Guaranteed Income, and Special Advisor to California Governor Gavin Newsom for Economic Mobility. In 2016, he was elected Mayor of Stockton at 26 years old. He was the city’s first African American mayor, and the youngest mayor of any major city in American history. He piloted the first mayor-led guaranteed income pilot in the country.

Jacqueline Waggoner is President, Solutions Division, at Enterprise Community Partners, one of the nation’s largest affordable housing nonprofits. From her work on the ground in hundreds of communities nationwide, to advocating for affordable housing at the highest levels of government, Waggoner leads the company’s programmatic, policy and advisory work in alignment with its strategic priorities: increasing the housing supply, advancing racial equity, and building upward mobility and resilience. She has served on a number of public, nonprofit and coalition Boards, including the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority Commission (chair) and its Ad Hoc Committee on Black People Experiencing Homelessness (chair).

ABOUT THE WEINGART FOUNDATION
The Weingart Foundation is a private, nonprofit grantmaking foundation that partners with communities across Southern California to advance racial, social, and economic justice for all. Our vision is a dynamic and effective social change sector that is creating equitable systems and structures needed to achieve justice. Founded in 1951, the Foundation has to date granted over $1 billion to organizations, strengthening their efforts in human services, housing, health, education, and community power building. In addition, the Foundation builds networks and collaboratives with philanthropic, public sector, and community leaders to advance equity and justice together.